References

Kollerup I, Thomsen AKA, Kornum JB. Use and quality of point-of-care microscopy, urine culture and susceptibility testing for urinalysis in general practice. Scand J Prim Health Care. 2022; https://doi.org/10.1080/02813432.2021.2022349

Sawadogo W, Tsegayer M, Gizaw A, Adera T. Overweight and obesity as risk factors for COVID-19-associated hospitalisations and death: systematic review and meta-analysis. BMJ Nutr Prev Health. 2022; 0 https://doi.org/10.1136/bmjnph-2021-000375

Perales RB, Palmer RF, Rincon R Does improving indoor air quality lessen symptoms associated with chemical intolerance?. Prim Health Care Res Dev. 2021; 23:(e3)1-12 https://doi.org/10.1017/S1463423621000864

Wright L, Steptoe A, Fancourt D. Patterns of compliance with COVID-19 preventive behaviours: a latent class analysis of 20 000 UK adults. J Epidemiol Community Health. 2021; 0:247-253 https://doi.org/10.1136/jech-2021-216876

RESEARCH ROUNDUP

02 March 2022
3 min read
Volume 33 · Issue 3

Abstract

George Winter provides an overview of recently published articles that are of interest to practice nurses. Should you wish to look at any of the papers in more detail, a full reference is provided.

In this meta-analysis of 208 studies with 3 550 997 participants from over 32 countries, Sawadogo et al (2022) evaluated the association between overweight or obesity and COVID-19-related hospitalisations (including hospital admission, intensive care unit admission, invasive mechanical ventilation and death). This study is the largest and most comprehensive summary of the association between obesity and COVID-19 outcomes to date.

They found that being overweight increases the risk of COVID-19-related hospitalisations but not death, with obesity and extreme obesity increasing the risk of both COVID-19-related hospitalisations and death. Possible mechanisms by which obesity could increase the risk of severe COVID-19 include first, that adipose tissue could be a reservoir for viral production; second, obesity is linked to impaired immune function weakening the body, which fails to contain viral replication; third, obesity increases inflammation, which may affect lung parenchyma and bronchi; and fourth, obesity lowers lung capacity and reserve thus making ventilation more difficult.

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